England

because historical romances are *always* so very realistic

Let’s face it, most all these historical romances are utterly and completely ridiculous:

Husbands coming back from the dead; long-lost heirs and heiresses; forged wills; bad-but-actually-good pirates and crime lords; kidnapped children and heroines; murdering psychopaths always on the loose (apparently England has a disproportionate number of crazies); frequent cases of amnesia and/or mistaken identity; an unbelievable lack of the ability to communicate or c lear up Big Misunderstandings (they desperately need to learn the “when you did ____, it made me feel ____” statement); thousands of hero-material noblemen running around England and almost every single one of them drop-dead-gorgeous, in their late 20s / early 30s, single, and of course just waiting for that one special woman who will completely transform their lives and their hearts when they fall in love with her; heroines we (almost always) love and can relate to, who just happen to often be wallflowers, plain janes, poor relations, unusual or odd, bluestockings, bullied by some dastardly person(s), running from some dastardly secret(s), etc.; man whores (a.k.a rakes and rogues) who for some reason all become perfect and 100%-faithful husbands once they meet said heroines; widows who in dramatically large numbers are still virgins so that when the love of their life comes along he can luckily be the first (and only) one she does the mattress dance with; romances between g overnesses / companions / maids / street urchins / secretaries and the lord of the house; good characters whom we’re rooting for always managing to stay alive while the bad ones we hate always die or are in some way dramatically publicly humiliated and ostracized; oh, and of course, the most unlikely thing of all: **always**, without fail, a HEA ending.

Yeah … sorry, what part of any of that sounded remotely realistic? None! … Which is why we read them :-).

——————————————————————————————————————–

The above rant (which I adored and am in complete agreement with) was part of a review published by Juliana (julianaphilippa) of goodreads that can be found and read here.

Merely A Mister (An utterly biased review)

Merely A Mister by Sherry Lynn Ferguson

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

To begin, let me say that Ms Ferguson penned one of my favourite regency romances a few years ago and so bought my loyalty for all eternity. It was the charming Lord Sidley's Last Season (Avalon Romance) Lord Sidley’s Last Season, which I would recommend to most regency lovers.

In three related but independent books, Ms Ferguson tells us the tales of three men, three brothers who are all descendants of dukes and all very stubbornly different from each other.

In Merely A Mister, the third and possibly final book in this series, we read about Lord Hayden, the eldest son and the heir to the Duke of Braughton.

Through Quiet Meg (Avalon Romance) (Avalon Romance) Quiet Meg (Avalon Romance) and Major Lord David Major Lord David I have known the dutiful, solemn side of the Marquis. I have also seen him come to his brother’s aid in a most unconventional way. It is easy to say that he puts family and honour before all personal happiness – he has sacrificed much – but he isn’t a push over. He challenges his father’s outdated ideas as he advices the Duke on matters of politics and admits to himself that it would take time and a lot of patience to usher in changes through his father. But as perfect a son and Marquis as Lord Hayden is, there are those in the ton who think him too serious, too much given to grim duty. And the same voices dub him ‘His Resplendence’ for certainly one of the duties of the heir to Braughton is to give in to the strict dictatorship of a demanding valet. (more…)

Elizabeth Bennet talks some sense into Margaret Hale/ When a North&South Miss meets a Pride&Prejudice Mrs/ fun made-up dialogue

The dialogue below is not my work, but taken from the blog What Would Lizzie Bennet Do? 

After Margaret Hale rejects the ardent and smoldering Mr Thornton, our Liz Bennet, the newly wedded Mrs Elizabeth Darcy takes her to hand and imparts a few life lessons.

—————————————————————————

Margaret Hale, I’d like you to meet Lizzie Bennet.

<–MH  <–LB (more…)